In Japan, Distance Learning Is Helping Kids Stay On Track

In Japan, Distance Learning Is Helping Kids Stay On Track Remote Work

On February 27, Shinzo Abe asked all schools in Japan to close until the end of the Spring Holidays in order to contain the current coronavirus outbreak. Despite an urgent and sudden request, most of the schools abided and closed doors on the day following the official announcement. As a result, kids in Japan were not schooled and had a lot of free time in their hands for more than a month.

New technologies, new habits

Ever since the coronavirus outbreak started to become a hot topic in Japan, the Government and other public institutions asked workers to shift to a remote schedule as much as possible. A quick look in Tokyo public transportation will quickly reveal that most of its users are office workers. That simply means that a computer and the internet could be enough for them to fulfill their everyday duties while practicing social distancing.

Remote working (テレワーク, telework) was encouraged in Japan for quite some time by public advertisement and official demands related to the Olympics, for example. We’re still a long way from making the switch to a society where remote work and work-life balance is the norm. However, as the COVID-19 situation seemed to have quickstart the debate around this question—what about remote schooling?

We’re still a long way from making the switch to a society where remote work and work-life balance is the norm

With only one night given to schools in order to set-up an effective set-up to perpetuate kids’ education on distance, it seems safe to say that it was nearly impossible to land on a perfect remote learning system this march. However, all relevant applications and software do already exist.

The recent evolution in terms of internet technologies—such as The Cloud emergence or distant meeting software—, the predominance of computer, …continue reading