BUSINESS – 2

Dec 01
SoftBank Group's mobile unit on Friday set an indicative price of 1,500 yen per share ahead of what would be Japan largest-ever initial public offering in December. (Nikkei)
Nov 29
Officials at major beverage maker Kirin are dropping their biggest domestic whisky brand. They say it's too difficult to maintain supply amid a recent spike in sales. (NHK)
Nov 28
Japan is revamping its automotive tax system to impose levies based on mileage, as revolution in green and sharing technologies squeeze revenue under the current framework. (Nikkei)
Nov 28
Japanese messaging app provider LINE is teaming up with Mizuho Financial Group to launch a bank. It will not have any outlets and specialize only in providing services for smartphone users. (NHK)
Nov 27
The board of Japanese automaker Mitsubishi Motors, which is allied with Renault and Nissan, voted unanimously Monday to dismiss Carlos Ghosn as its chairman following his arrest last week. (Japan Today)

Nov 26
NHK has learned that former Nissan Motor Chairman Carlos Ghosn has denied underreporting his earnings in the company's securities reports. Sources say Ghosn told prosecutors in Tokyo that he had no intention of falsifying the financial statements. (NHK)
Nov 26
A snow crab caught in the western Japan prefecture of Tottori earlier this month has been recognized by Guinness World Records as receiving the most expensive-ever bid for a crab at auction, the prefectural government said. (Japan Today)
Nov 24
The removal of Carlos Ghosn as chairman of Nissan Motor reveals deep tensions inside the Japanese automaker's alliance with Renault and Mitsubishi Motors, as the partners struggle to chart a future without the charismatic leader who held them all together. (Nikkei)
Nov 23
Nissan Motor's board of directors has voted unanimously to oust Carlos Ghosn as chairman. The executive was arrested earlier this week on suspicion of underreporting his income by tens of millions of dollars on corporate financial statements. (NHK)
Nov 22
Solid-state batteries have the potential to dominate the next generation of batteries, letting Japanese companies regain prominence in a field they once led. (Nikkei)

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