Category Archives: BUSINESS

Chanel opens Rouge Coco Gloss lipstick cafe pop-up in Omotesando

chanel coco cafe omotesando lipstick tokyo

Chanel will open a pop-up space on Omotesando in March. Coco Cafe will be open at So-Cal Link Gallery from March 3rd until March 12th.

The spacious-looking Coco Cafe will feature advance sales of a new lipstick, Rouge Coco Gloss, as well as makeup services provided by Chanel specialists, cosmetics sampling, and even a selfie space. It is located down a side street off the main Omotesando boulevard.

chanel coco cafe omotesando lipstick tokyo

chanel coco cafe omotesando lipstick tokyo

chanel coco cafe omotesando lipstick tokyo

chanel coco cafe omotesando lipstick tokyo

This isn’t the first time that Chanel has promoted its products with a pop-up in Tokyo’s most exclusive retail district. In 2015, Chanel opened a lipstick-themed pop-up sampling space that even looked like the rouge lipstick it was promoting.

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Market failure or low-skills equilibrium?

As we know from countless growth accounting studies, the ability of a country to educate and train its citizens is a key determinant of economic development. There is also fairly strong evidence at the company level that a workforce with higher human capital generates higher productivity. In other words, not only are there strong incentives for governments to educate and train people, but there are also incentives at the firm level for companies to hire more educated workers and to offer training to their existing workers.

Many firms do train their workers, but it is clear from the evidence that the tendency to train declines with enterprise size. Large firms train more than medium-sized firms, and small firms train more than microenterprises. This suggests that there is a “sized-induced market failure” in enterprise training. We find size-related market failures in other aspects of the enterprise environment, with the most obvious case being access to finance. Large firms have much less difficulty than small firms in securing credit or other forms of finance (Vandenberg, Chantapacdepong and Yoshino 2016).

Barriers to training. Just as there are specific reasons why smaller firms have the less access to finance (i.e. information, collateral, loan size, and processing costs), there are evident reasons why smaller firms are less likely to offer training. Removing workers from production to attend training is more disruptive for small firms, and hiring in-company trainers, let alone establishing a training department, is costly and unaffordable for most small firms. Linking up with local training institutes and finding appropriate training courses can also be time-consuming and not always fruitful, and finding out where and how to apply for government training subsidies and taking the time to do so can further discourage employers.

Our analysis of data from over 5,000 enterprises across the People’s Republic of China, …continue reading

    

‘America First’ is unlikely to shake up the Asia Pacific

Author: Ted Gover, Central Texas College

President Trump’s ‘America First’ doctrine is a vigorous argument to change the United States’ actions at home and abroad while departing from the US postwar order that Trump argues left many US workers behind. This markedly different platform has created uncertainty in regional affairs, giving policymakers in Washington and elsewhere plenty of consternation as they strive to adjust.

US Defense Secretary Jim Mattis reviews the honour guard before a meeting with Japan’s Defense Minister Tomomi Inada at the Defense Ministry in Tokyo, Japan, 4 February 2017 (Photo: Reuters/Toru Hanai)

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Trump’s disrespectful treatment of Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull during their phone discussion covering the refugee resettlement agreement on 28 January made headlines around the world. It rattled nerves and left many confused as to what ‘America First‘ meant for US policy in the Asia Pacific.

Yet as is the case with any new administration, key members of Trump’s team are vying for influence. Some — most notably Defense Secretary James Mattis and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson — are striving to mould ‘America First’ into something reflective of traditional US foreign policy norms.

Mattis and Tillerson’s pragmatic approach of shoring up alliances and meeting US security commitments in the region reflect the Republican foreign policy establishment. It will likely prevail …continue reading

    

Mitsui to market US real estate & infrastructure funds in Japan

Source: ijapicap.com

Giant trading firm Mitsui & Co is to enter a “strategic partnership” with Los Angeles-based CIM Group LLC that will see it “strongly supporting [the] marketing of CIM’s funds to the Japanese market through Japan Alternative Investment Co, a wholly-owned Mitsui subsidiary, with an aim of raising several hundred billion yen of new capital from Japanese investors in the coming years”. CIM focuses on real estate and infrastructure investment.

The arrangement will see Mitsui acquiring 20% of the US company and investing in several of its funds. Total outlays are expected to be US$450-550 million. The full announcement is here.

© 2016 Japan Pensions Industry Database/Jo McBride. Reporting on, and analysis of, the secretive business of Japanese institutional investment takes big commitments of money and time. This blog is one of the products of such commitment. It may nonetheless be reproduced or used as a source without charge so long as (but only so long as) the use is credited to www.ijapicap.com and a link provided to the original text on that site.

This blog would not exist without the help and humour of Diane Stormont, 1959-2012

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Keeping an eye on US–China semiconductor supremacy struggles

Author: Stephen Olson, Hinrich Foundation

China’s ambitions for its semiconductor industry will provide a telling bellwether for the future of US–China trade relations. China’s objectives — and the way they intend to achieve them — will raise vexing issues for US policymakers. Similar issues are arising across several other key sectors, and the way the semiconductor issue is resolved will tell us a lot about whether the two countries will be able to work out a broader modus vivendi for their future trading relationship.

A researcher plants a piece from semiconductor wafer on an interface board which is placed under a microscope during a research work to design and develop a semiconductor product at Tsinghua Unigroup research centre in Beijing, China, 26 February 2016. (Photo: Reuters/Kim Kyung-Hoon).

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Semiconductors have become a fundamental building block of today’s high-tech knowledge economy, powering everything from cell phones to sophisticated medical diagnostic equipment and solar panels. The most formidable military weaponry in the world also relies on semiconductor technology. Maintaining a lead position in this critical industry is one of the hallmarks that separate advanced economies from the rest of the pack.

China has become the foremost global powerhouse when it comes to exporting the various information and communication technology products that depend on semiconductors. But it lags far behind the leaders when it comes to its ability to produce the semiconductors needed to power these products.

Indeed, the flagship Chinese semiconductor company, SMIC, …continue reading