Category Archives: CULTURE

Otome Romance Jigsaws: Midnight Cinderella & Destined to Love Released on Steam

Source: Spark Blog
otomejigsaw.jpg

Today, Otome Romance Jigsaws: Midnight Cinderella & Destined to Love got released on Steam. The game is a jigsaw puzzle featuring puzzle art from Midnight Cinderella:Ikémen Royal Romances and Destined to Love: Ikémen Samurai Romances otome visual novels. Current price is $9.99 or ¥‎1124.53. For more details, check out the store page. Here’s the trailer.

Steam: http://store.steampowered.com/app/598670/

Official Website: http://www.bottlecube.co.jp/13product/170208/ …continue reading

    

Otome Romance Jigsaws: Midnight Cinderella & Destined to Love Released on Steam

Source: Spark Blog
otomejigsaw.jpg

Today, Otome Romance Jigsaws: Midnight Cinderella & Destined to Love got released on Steam. The game is a jigsaw puzzle featuring puzzle art from Midnight Cinderella:Ikémen Royal Romances and Destined to Love: Ikémen Samurai Romances otome visual novels. Current price is $9.99 or ¥‎1124.53. For more details, check out the store page. Here’s the trailer.

Steam: http://store.steampowered.com/app/598670/

Official Website: http://www.bottlecube.co.jp/13product/170208/ …continue reading

    

Osaka Asian Film Festival 2017 Program Part 1: Opening and Closing Films and Competition Films

oaff2017_posterart_english

The organisers behind Osaka Asian Film Festival (OAFF) released the full programme of every film that will be screened during its run from March 03rd until March 12th last week and it’s an impressive line-up.

The beginning of the year is always a busy one when it comes to international film festivals since Rotterdam and Berlin showcase their programmes and start screening things that will filter to the rest of the world at some point. Add the Osaka Asian Film Festival to that list because it is establishing itself as a platform for Asian filmmakers. This year demonstrates why it has a growing international reputation since there are many world and international premieres and a lot of filmmakers are going to attend the festival to talk about their work. On top of writing my usual previews for the aforementioned festival, I am working for Osaka as well.

Full disclosure, I am at the festival in the capacity as a writer, helping out with the event and watching some of the films. I will attempt to review as many as possible but for now, I’ll give previews.

I’m very excited to bring these previews to you not least because I wrote the synopses for each of them and I got a chance to watch some of the films already and the amount of talent I have seen is impressive. As a person based in the West, sometimes it’s difficult to see what the rest of the world produces in terms of cinema so this is a real education for me. The titles from the Philippines and Thailand have been really impressive and show local film industries that are producing daring and interesting works.

Here’s what has been programmed for the opening, closing and competition films. There is mention of guests but to …continue reading

    

I Rolled a Lucky Seven Years of Blogging

Rurouni Kenshin art

(Look, 7 of my favorite manga characters from one of the series that helped me a lot while I was in college.)

This past weekend makes 7 years of blogging for me. 700 posts later and here I am, outlasting arguably a large number of anime bloggers (including some notable ones). I’m kind of speechless that I’ve managed to get some things done despite my schedule getting tighter as I’ve gotten older.

There are a few things I want to get off my chest. First off, there’s way too much manga licensed now in my neck of the woods. It feels like almost every title I’ve heard of via the internet is somehow in English. We live in an interesting time as there’s now a new debate where certain titles (ie Chihayafuru) may be better suited for online distribution versus print. With that said, I’m not sure how motivated I feel about reading manga these days. I still like to explore various titles thanks to libraries and bookstores around my area, but events in my life have dealt a hand where I felt that I needed to stop for the time being.

Which leads me to the 2nd thought I have in my mind – I’ve become less fond of social media. I deactivated my Twitter account since early January. I don’t want to get into how this came about, but let’s just say that social media was becoming a distraction. I let it dictate how happy I should be and it cost me. I’m also tired of all the rhetoric dialogue that doesn’t lead anywhere. I met some great people on Twitter, but I began to realize that maybe I don’t need it as much as I thought. Here’s the funny thing – when you express …continue reading

    

It Means The Most When It Is Unsaid

The thing that I enjoy most about Japan is the harmonious co-existence of contradictions. While contradictions often create disagreement and chaos in many places, that is not quite the same in Japan. There seems to be this huge invisible force that mandates the opposites to get along with each other, to not interfere and to accept and make peace.I figured that it is this huge set of unspoken rues that guides the peace and these rules seems to reside in every Japanese person. A set of rules that regulates and controls every aspect of their behavior and ultimately forms their very strong social consensus.“KY (kuuki wo yomu or “read the air”) – non Japanese do this as well, but in a different way and to a different extent. To (most of us) non Japanese, its obvious that we say, should not go to the bank in our pajamas. To a Japanese person, it is obvious in a similar way that in some situations a person who smiles too much is not to be trifled with”. (Kyle Von Lanken)While it is not impossible for one to live here without fully internalizing this mysterious set of unspoken rules, foreigners who are found ignorant or breaking these said rules can be pardoned, but that also mean an automatic exclusion from being “one of us”, a.k.a. Gaijin (an outside person).Social Manifestations Of The Unspoken RulesI reckon that there are a few very Japanese traits that best manifests the rules and also help set the foundation of this harmonious society.- Never be in the face of others- Don’t cause inconvenience to others- Always seek agreement not discussion- …continue reading