Category Archives: FEATURED

Just how bad was the damage from Cyclone Pam in Vanuatu? A group of thugs gang rape a nun, and as South Korea and Japan prepare to meet once more to discuss the sexual enslavement of women during World War II, one Tokyo-based advocate sheds some light on Prime Minister Abe.

Cyclone Pam, India Nun Gang-Raped, and Abe on Comfort Women


Listen to or download the podcast.

Monday, March 16, 2015

Just how bad was the damage from Cyclone Pam in Vanuatu? A group of thugs gang rape a nun, and as South Korea and Japan prepare to meet once more to discuss the sexual enslavement of women during World War II, one Tokyo-based advocate sheds some light on Prime Minister Abe.

Cyclone Pam Smashes Vanuatu

Cyclone Pam, a category five storm pummeled Vanuatu, killing at least eight and caused massive flooding. Some 50,000 children may also be affected from the second strongest cyclone ever to be recorded.

Nun gang-raped

On Saturday, a truly disgusting story broke from India, where six men broke into a convent and raped a nun in her seventies.

Prime Minister Abe Never Apologizes

South Korea and Japan are set to meet this week, to resume discussions on resolving the long, outstanding differences regarding the sexual enslavement of women during World War II, also known as the Comfort Woman. One potential roadblock to progress: Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

NOTES TAB 3.16.15

Just how bad was the damage from Cyclone Pam in Vanuatu? A group of thugs gang rape a nun, and as South Korea and Japan prepare to meet once more to discuss the sexual enslavement of women during World War II, one Tokyo-based advocate sheds some light on Prime Minister Abe.

Keep up with news from the region by following Asia News Weekly on Facebook or Twitter. You can also send an email to the show with your comments, questions, and feedback. Just drop a line to podcast@asianewsweekly.net.

Subscribe to this and other podcasts at AsiaNewsWeekly.net. Subscribing is free and when you do, the next episode is delivered automatically to you.

Sources

Thailand’s junta leader continues to solidify his power, is it a good idea to lower the voting age in Japan, and get ready for more action in the South China Sea. These stories and more are on the March 13th edition of Asia News Weekly.

Redefining adulthood in Japan, democracy losing out in Asia, and more


Listen or download the podcast here.

Thailand’s junta leader continues to solidify his power, is it a good idea to lower the voting age in Japan, and get ready for more action in the South China Sea. These stories and more are on the March 13th edition of Asia News Weekly.

Prayuth Solidifies hold on Thailand

One of the biggest criticisms facing Thailand’s junta leader Prayuth Chan-o-cha, is that the reforms he insists are being slowly implemented will restore democracy to the nation. This week, information has surfaced that lends more support to critics who say he really wants to solidify his hold on power.

Lowering Voting Age in Japan

Last year, Japan’s legislature announced plans to lower the voting age in Japan from 20 to 18. Is this a good idea? What are the ramifications? Returning to the podcast is Michael Cucek, Adjunct Fellow at the Institute for Contemporary Asian Studies at Temple University Japan to fill in those blanks.

Hong Kong Still Losing Democracy Battle

China’s Parliament essentially dealt a death blow to Hong Kong’s current democracy movement. With roughly 2 years before the implementation of “universal suffrage,” what are Hong Kongers to do?

Xi and the South China Sea

Ever since China unveiled the nine dash line, which encompassed nearly all of the South China Sea, we’ve seen a more aggressive stance by the Asian powerhouse. Two pieces of information came to light this week that bear keeping an eye on and demonstrate why more attention must be paid to the area.

Regional Updates

Rounding out the podcast are a few other stories worth keeping an eye on. Will the H7N9 flu turn into a world wide pandemic? South Korea brings up Japan at the UN and asks for another apology. Plus updates on the Myanmar student protests, allegations by China that Uyghurs in Xinjiang are joining Daesh, and the possibility of a meet between North Korea and Japan discussing abductees.

Thailand’s junta leader continues to solidify his power, is it a good idea to lower the voting age in Japan, and get ready for more action in the South China Sea. These stories and more are on the March 13th edition of Asia News Weekly.

Keep up with news from the region by following Asia News Weekly on Facebook or Twitter. You can also send an email to the show with your comments, questions, and feedback. Just drop a line to podcast@asianewsweekly.net.

Subscribe to this and other podcasts at AsiaNewsWeekly.net. Subscribing is free and when you do, the next episode is delivered automatically to you.

Notes

Learning Negative Imperative Sentences in Japanese

neim

When you want to just tell someone, “Don’t talk so loud, please”, how would you say that in Japanese? As a mom, I feel like I use the negative imperative forms all the time with my kids. I know it’s not good to talk to them so negatively, but some days, I just can’t help it! So, in my blog post today, I would like to cover some of the examples of negative imperatives in Japanese.

photo from subtle_3106 on flickr.com

Don’t come here!

1) Kocchini konaide! こっちに来ないで!こっちに こないで!

2) Kocchini kuruna! こっちに来るな! こっちにくるな!

Just like the way I explained the imperative sentences the other day in my post (here), there are two ways of saying in negative imperative sentences as well.

The first one is pretty standard way of saying it. The second expression is much more manly and more authoritative. Most of the ladies will not use the second expression as they would be using the first expression.

Don’t be so loud!

1) Urusaku shinaide! うるさくしないで!

2) Urusaku suruna! うるさくするな!

Don’t run!

1) Hashiranai de! 走らないで!はしらないで!Hashiranai! はしらない!

2) Hashiruna!  走るな!

Moms will often tell children, “Don’t run!”, but this one will be translated as Hashiranai de! 走らないで!はしらないで! in Japanese. …continue reading

    

TLT: Kit Kats

KitKats02

Regardless of where you live in the world, you’ve probably eaten a Kit Kat chocolate bar before, or have seen one, or at least have heard of them. However, you haven’t really eaten/seen/heard of a Kit Kat bar until you eat/see/hear about Japan’s!

My current stash of Kit Kats!

Since moving to Japan, I’ve seen dark chocolate, pumpkin, strawberry, raspberry, blueberry cheesecake, green tea, dragonfruit, citrus golden blend, cookies and cream (my favourite!), hot Japanese chili pepper… You name it, Japan has a flavoured Kit Kat for it! I’ve even heard of wasabi-flavoured ones!

Some of these Kit Kats are dyed to match their flavour, too, such as the sakura matcha (cherry blossom-green tea) Kit Kats that I bought at Narita Airport during last winter vacation. Despite their green colour, they were actually really good!

Green sakura matcha Kit Kats! Don’t let the colour fool you – they’re actually delicious! (Source)

And not only can the colours and flavours be unique, but so can the method of eating them. In fact, Kit Kat Japan has even made a bakeable Kit Kat.

Seriously!

The pudding-flavoured bakeable Kit Kats that I tried!

The pudding-flavoured… bakeable Kit Kats?!

As a Westerner living in Japan, …continue reading