Category Archives: FOOD

Japan’s favourite eggs are chicken, salmon and cod

Hard-boiled or soft-boiled egs? graph of japanese statistics

This survey from @nifty looked at egg-based foods, covering both bird eggs and fish roe.

My parents often ate cod roe and herring roe; I only tried cod once as a child, but I can still remember the unpleasant texture. Although we ate a lot of salmon in our house (my father would regularly catch many fish) I cannot remember salmon roe ever appearing on the table. I don’t know if it was that he only went fishing after the spawning season, or he chucked them away, or what. Next time I’m on the phone I’ll have to ask!

By the way, note that percentages with one decimal place are exact values, but with no decimal places are estimates read off graphs.

Here’s some typical salmon roe – to me it just looks too polished and deeply-coloured, so I always suspect there must be artificial colouring added (they do it to farmed salmon meat, so why not eggs too) and something else pre-serving for that extra shine:

Research results

Q1: About how many eggs do you eat per week? (Sample size=2,735)

None 3%
One 7%
Two 15.2%
Three 18.6%
Four 10%
Five 13.8%
Six 5%
Seven 13%
Eight 2%
Nine 0%
Ten 6%
11 to 15 3%
16 to 20 1%
21 to 30 0%
31 or more 0%

Counting 11 to 15 as 11, 16 to 20 as 16, 21 to 30 as 21, and 31 or more as 31, the average weekly egg consumption was around 4.5. It’s not clear if this was eggs as eggs only, or included an estimate of eggs in other food like baking.

Q2: What points are important when buying eggs? (Sample size=2,735, multiple answer)

Price 67.0%
Use-by date 44.7%
Size 36.2%
Number in pack 32.3%
Safety 15.5%
Region of origin 14%
Shell colour 14%
Shop selling them 9%
Brand 7%
Nutritiousness 6%
How they are kept (chilled or room temperature) 4%
How the birds are kept 3%
Yolk colour 2%
Whether fertilised or not 1%
Other 1%
Don’t buy eggs 6%

Q3: How do you prefer your boiled eggs? (Sample size=2,735)

Soft-boiled 54.9%
Hard-boiled 39.8%
Don’t eat boiled eggs 3.2%
Other 2.1%

Q4: What do you put on your fried eggs? (Sample size=2,735, multiple answer, top ten)

Rank Percentage

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5 Reasons Why Dominique Ansel Bakery Is Not Your Ordinary Bakery

Much has been said and written about Dominique Ansel, the award-winning French pastry chef who made it big in the United States by introducing the next-best culinary invention of the 21st century — the almighty Cronut. And so much more. He’s been called the Van Gogh of pastry making and has been in the spotlight probably more often than most Hollywood stars over the past few years. Now, two years after the grand opening of his first flagship bakery and cafe in Tokyo’s Omotesando, and a second take-out branch in Ginza’s Mitsukoshi department store this spring, he is making it big in Japan as well. The Omotesando bakery, the chain’s first international store, is currently one of the hottest bakeries in Tokyo — and here are five reasons why.

1. It never stays the same

An impressive selection: A glimpse of Dominique Ansel Bakery’s Omotesando store’s cakes.

Dominique Ansel Bakery is like the culinary sister of Cirque du Soleil — innovative, creative and always evolving. Take the Cronut, for example. Each flavor is decided on a monthly basis and no flavor can ever be repeated — not only at the Tokyo store but at the New York and London’s stores as well. This is done to keep you entertained (and impressed) and results in some unique combinations — Apricot Caramel, Cherry Coconut, Chestnut Rose, Pistachio or Lychee Cronut, to name a few of the latest.

Dominique Ansel’s mouthwatering Cronuts: One of our favorite of the year, the August 2017’s Apricot Caramel with Lemon Sugar Cronut.

Seasonal specials get even more creative — just think of the Blossoming Hot Chocolate, the drink with a flower-shaped marshmallow that unfolds under heat to reveal a tiny ball of …continue reading

    

Pepsi Christmas Cola in Japan

Pepsi Christmas Cola

Japan is famous for its unique and unusual Pepsi flavours that come out to celebrate the different seasons and events here in Japan. Popular past flavours include Pepsi Pink Cola for cherry blossom season in spring and Pepsi White Cola for winter. This year, news has come out that Pepsi will be releasing a special Christmas Cake flavoured Pepsi for Christmas in Japan.

Christmas Cake is the highlight of any Christmas meal in Japan, typically served at the very end of the meal. Back home in Australia, Christmas Cake is a heavy fruit cake that is full of dried fruit and nuts. Here in Japan, Christmas Cake is typically a gorgeous sponge cake, frosted with whipped cream, topped with strawberries, and elaborately decorated for the Christmas season.

Christmas Cake in Japan

The Japan exclusive Pepsi Christmas Cola looks very similar in appearance to the Pepsi White Cola from a few years back, but has a totally different taste flavour-wise. Inspired from Christmas Cake in Japan this unique tasting Pepsi mixes white cola with sweet cream with tangy strawberry flavours.

Pepsi Christmas Cola
Pepsi Christmas Cola

Pepsi Christmas Cola will be on sale from November 21 for a limited time only. What do you guys think? Do you plan on getting your hands on a bottle of this unique cake-flavoured cola? Please share your thoughts in the comments below.

Suntory Japan

Pepsi Christmas Cola

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Thanksgiving In Tokyo: 6 Spots To Gobble Down The Holiday

It’s only a week until Thanksgiving (if you’re celebrating the American way) and while the holiday isn’t as popular in Japan as Halloween or Christmas, over the past few years we’ve witnessed a number of eateries setting up special plans for guests who wish to celebrate the event. If you’re not roasting a turkey yourself this year, here’s a list of restaurants in Tokyo that offer authentic Thanksgiving dinners, almost on a par with what you’d have back home.

This season, give thanks to friends and family by ditching the oven and celebrating out in the city! Happy Thanksgiving!


1. The Oak Door, Roppongi


Grand Hyatt Tokyo’s popular The Oak Door invites you to stay away from the oven this year to just sit back and relax — because here everything will be done for you just the way you’d want to have it. The restaurant’s special Thanksgiving Dinner set includes an arugula salad, butternut squash soup, turkey (oven roasted with rustic bread and sausage stuffing), a pumpkin pie for a dessert and your choice of tea or coffee to end the feast.

Where: The Oak Door, Grand Hyatt Tokyo, 6-10-3 Roppongi, Minato, Tokyo
When: 23–25 November, 6 p.m. – 10 p.m.
Cost: ¥9,000


2. T.Y.Harbor, Shinagawa


With its stunning view of Tokyo Bay and chic ambience, this restaurant‘s Thanksgiving menu gets a few extra brownie points among foreign residents. The full-course menu features a delicious set of a creamy soup of parsnip purée topped with crispy prosciutto and parsnip chips, a roasted turkey breast with mushroom gravy, cornbread stuffing, baked sweet potatoes, green beans and cranberry relish as a main course, a roasted butternut squash and coconut tart with whipped cream, pumpkin seeds and vanilla ice …continue reading