Category Archives: FOOD

Craft Beer Bars Japan - Tap and Growler: Shimo-Kitazawa

Source: bento.com

Craft beer to go is the selling point at this tiny neighborhood bar. They’ve got eighteen taps dispensing a nicely varied selection of Japanese craft beers, including some rarities, and you can either enjoy a half-pint here or fill a growler to take home (or both). The first time you get take-out beer you have to buy one of their growler containers, starting at Y1350 for the 32-ounce size – after that you can bring your container back to refill it.

In addition to draft beer they also offer a selection of hard-to-find bottled beers, also for here or to go. These include unusual beers that are so in demand that they’ve set a limit of one bottle per person of any given bottled beer. Beers on draft run around Y600-810 per half pint, with similar prices for standard-size bottles.

The food menu is limited to bar snacks like nuts, but you’re allowed to bring your own food, or order delivery service from Eight’s Burger or other nearby shops. There’s no cover charge and no bottle charge, and free WiFi is available. …continue reading

    

Stay Warm With This Delicious and Healthy Nabe Recipe

Source: Gaijin Pot
veggies-1

If you’re like me and you live in an old style Japanese house (once referred to as structurally similar to a portacabin by my Dad), you’ll know how hard it is to keep warm in the winter months. For me, the three best ways to warm up are: to have a long hot bath, to cradle a hot water bottle and to eat Nabe.

Tounyuu Nabe is a soy milk hotpot; it’s healthy, nutritious and a delicious winter dish, which you can make at home quickly and easily. I was lucky enough to first try it in an authentic manner at a close Japanese friends’ of mine Ryokanesque style house in Chiba.

I was so impressed by the delicate taste that I thought I’d give it a go. It’s pretty straightforward to make with the added bonus of being healthy.

Ingredients you need are:

  • 500ml soy milk

  • 500ml water

  • 1tsp dashi (fish stock)

  • 1tsp sake

  • salt
  • 
1tsp Asian chicken stock
  • 2tsp soy sauce
  • 
1-2 packs of tori dango (chicken balls)
  • Mushrooms, carrots, leeks, hakusai (Chinese cabbage)
  • 1 pack of tofu
1 pack of abura (aged tofu)
  • Ponzu for dipping

Step 1

Cut the vegetables, aburu and tofu into bite sized pieces. Then set aside.

Step 2

In a cooking pot heat 500ml soy milk on a …continue reading

    

TLT: Kit Kats

KitKats02

Regardless of where you live in the world, you’ve probably eaten a Kit Kat chocolate bar before, or have seen one, or at least have heard of them. However, you haven’t really eaten/seen/heard of a Kit Kat bar until you eat/see/hear about Japan’s!

My current stash of Kit Kats!

Since moving to Japan, I’ve seen dark chocolate, pumpkin, strawberry, raspberry, blueberry cheesecake, green tea, dragonfruit, citrus golden blend, cookies and cream (my favourite!), hot Japanese chili pepper… You name it, Japan has a flavoured Kit Kat for it! I’ve even heard of wasabi-flavoured ones!

Some of these Kit Kats are dyed to match their flavour, too, such as the sakura matcha (cherry blossom-green tea) Kit Kats that I bought at Narita Airport during last winter vacation. Despite their green colour, they were actually really good!

Green sakura matcha Kit Kats! Don’t let the colour fool you – they’re actually delicious! (Source)

And not only can the colours and flavours be unique, but so can the method of eating them. In fact, Kit Kat Japan has even made a bakeable Kit Kat.

Seriously!

The pudding-flavoured bakeable Kit Kats that I tried!

The pudding-flavoured… bakeable Kit Kats?!

As a Westerner living in Japan, …continue reading

    

We Just Hadda Whip a U-ey on This One !

Source: Mike
50's Cafe, Hamburgers, Mexican, food

100% Beef Burger

That’s what caught my eye as Doc was driving back up the eastern side of the island.
We had been out enjoying the sun and shooting cameras, before the typhoon hits.
Not to worry, we only expect a bit of wind with lots of rain.
Luckily, a red light, stopped us just as we passed the place.
The artist who made that hamburger sign, knew what he or, she, was doing.
We were both hungry and the only way to reach the place was a U-turn into a parking lot.
So, that’s what we did.
For those who haven’t mastered English slang as well as me:
U-ey means, a U-turn and hadda, means, had to.
Yadda, yadda, yadda, class dismissed.
menu,Route 66, signs, food

…continue reading