Category Archives: SOCIETY

Japanese Kit Kat Taste Test

Well.. I just did one video in my last entry – why not another.

For those of us stuck in anyplace NOT Japan, we are quite limited in our Kit Kat chocolate selections… with chocolate, dark chocolate… I think there’s an orange flavor… but that’s about it.

In Japan… there are over 200 flavor varieties. 200!!!!

Here’s a video that gives some of these flavors to Americans who are not experienced with Japan – and then films their reactions.

Anyhow, thanks to Julien for the heads up!

Have a nice light snack!


Kanpai,
Andrew Joseph

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LEGO Dioramas Featuring Japan

I like LEGO. I never played with it as a kid, but as an adult – yeah. My son, who is approaching nine seems to like it building things – but only new things, hence the hundreds of kits in our house – and the whole cityscape in his bedroom, but doesn’t get into rebuilding things.

Me… I like to try and create dioramas – scenes from my imagination, inspired or otherwise. I’m currently working on constructing a Doctor Who space tunnel that the tardis goes through when traveling through time and space. It’s slow going, as I need to figure out how to make it twist and turn (I know) and then shrink it to a singularity at the end.

But… every time I think I’m getting good at building with LEGO, I see the work others do and I feel like a nine-year-old who should better stick with just building kits.

It’s not just the skill, it is also the availability of bricks – in the color and shape I require… that costs money, and for whatever reason, that’s sorta tight.

Anyhow, here are some of the cool Japanese dioramas I saw recently that put my ‘skill’ to shame:

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“Who owns this monkey’s selfie?”

Image and text borrowed from MSN News, August 7, 2014.

When a monkey commandeered a nature photographer’s camera on a small Indonesian island a few years ago, the results were extraordinary. Among the images captured by the crested black macaque were a few amazing images of himself.

Those monkey selfies made headlines back in 2011, and two of the photographs made their way to the Wikipedia page for the monkey’s species, which is endangered. Wikipedia only uses images that are in the public domain, but the feeling was that, since the monkey snapped the photo, no one could claim the copyrights to it.

“This file is in the public domain, because as the work of a non-human animal, it has no human author in whom copyright is vested,” Wikipedia’s collective band of editors explained.

The nature photographer, David Slater, felt otherwise. He sent a takedown request to the Wikimedia Foundation, which operates Wikipedia, claiming that the photographs belong to him because they were taken with his camera.

“We didn’t agree, so we denied the request,” Wikimedia said in a new report about takedown requests it has received. The organization clearly highlighted the monkey selfie dispute in an effort to …continue reading

    

Yomiuri: TV shows to get foreign-language subtitles by 2020 for “foreign visitors” to Tokyo Olympics. Nice, but how about for NJ residents now?

Source: debito.org

KM: Hi Debito! Here’s another indication that the government cares more about short-term visitors than about the foreigners who actually live here:

Yomiuri: The Internal Affairs and Communications Ministry will develop a system to show Japanese TV programs with subtitles in foreign languages, including English and Chinese, to provide a more comfortable viewing experience for foreign visitors, according to sources. In response to the increasing number of visitors from overseas, the envisaged system will be launched by 2020, the year in which the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics will be held, the sources said. Behind the ministry’s decision were requests from foreign visitors for more foreign-language subtitles for domestic TV programs. The envisaged system will be offered for news programs related to visitors’ safety and security during their stay, as well as variety shows.

KM: I have a few thoughts about this:

1) It probably would be nice to have more programing with English subtitles (and subtitles in other languages) but I’m a bit surprised that such a huge adjustment to daily programing in Japan would be made on behalf of those visiting short-term for the olympics. Of course, it would be open to anyone but the article …continue reading