Category Archives: SOCIETY

Will China create a new militarized maritime border in the South China Sea? Thailand’s Prime Minister has lifted martial law, but is that a good move? Plus what’s raising tension on the Korean peninsula? These and more this week.

Militarizing South China Sea Borders, Problems in the Koreas, Thailand ends Martial Law and more


Audio Version:

Friday | April 3, 2015

Philippines resumes land reclamation projects in South China Sea (0:56)

Tensions are once more rising in the South China Sea, as both the Philippines and China resume land reclamation projects. Both nations say they have the right to carry out these activities, while at the same time condemning the actions of the other. To help sort this out, Scott Harold, Political Scientist and Deputy Director for the Center for Asia-Pacific Policy at the RAND Corporation joins the podcast.

Thailand enters a new phase (13:15)

This week, Thailand’s Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha lifted martial law in the Kingdom. However, that’s doesn’t mean things are going back to normal. He’s invoked Article 44, giving him expansive powers. Joining the podcast once more is Joshua Kurlantzick, Senior Fellow for Southeast Asia at the Council on Foreign Relations to put things into perspective.

Problems on the Korean Peninsula (15:13)

Two nations who simply can’t get along and consistently find ways to draw other nations into their troubled mix. This week Seoul and Pyongyang spar over THAAD, ICBMs, and alleged spies as President Park gets called out for how she handled the Sewol Ferry investigation.

Super Typhoon Maysak (21:28)

Typhoon Maysak is slated to make landfall in the Philippines this Easter weekend. It was once rated a category five story, but has since weakened. Joining me via Skype with the latest is Robert Speta from Western Pacific Weather.

Regional Updates (25:43)

Rounding out the podcast are a series of other stories from the region. Twelve people were killed and 11 houses buried after a landslide was triggered by heavy rain in Sukabumi, West Java, Indonesia. An important WWII museum opens in Guilin, southern China honoring the Flying Tigers. Plus news on Thailand’s airlines being downgraded, CERN powering up the LHC, and a South Korean criminal tries to get away.

Will China create a new militarized maritime border in the South China Sea? Thailand’s Prime Minister has lifted martial law, but is that a good move? Plus what’s raising tension on the Korean peninsula? These and more this week.

Keep up with news from the region by following Asia News Weekly on Facebook or Twitter. You can also send an email to the show with your comments, questions, and feedback. Just drop a line to podcast@asianewsweekly.net.

Subscribe to this and other podcasts at AsiaNewsWeekly.net. Subscribing is free and when you do, the next episode is delivered automatically to yo

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Problems with Indonesian sex abuse case and reporters arrested in Malaysia. Plus South Korea realizes the obvious need to update its cyber security.

Questions in Indonesian sex abuse case, reporters arrested in Malaysia, and South Korea ups cyber security


Audio Version

Thursday |  April 2, 2015

Troubling legal stories from Indonesia and Malaysia beg the question, “Can you get a fair shake?” Plus South Korea realizes the obvious need to update its cyber security.

Troubling issues in Jakarta teacher sex abuse case

This past December, the trials of Neil Bantleman and Ferdinand Tjiong began in Jakarta, Indonesia for sexual abuse of students. Aside from the proceedings being closed, a number of issues have arisen that question if the pair are getting a fair trial.

Media Members arrested for Sedition

Five members from the private news outlet Malaysian Insider have been arrested under the nation’s sedition laws. It is the latest in a series of questionable actions by the government.

South Korea to beef up cyber defenses

South Korea will create a new high-level cyber security post, and boy is it needed. North Korea has repeatedly hacked and hampered networks.

Problems with Indonesian sex abuse case and reporters arrested in Malaysia. Plus South Korea realizes the obvious need to update its cyber security.

Keep up with news from the region by following Asia News Weekly on Facebook or Twitter. You can also send an email to the show with your comments, questions, and feedback. Just drop a line to podcast@asianewsweekly.net.

Subscribe to this and other podcasts at AsiaNewsWeekly.net. Subscribing is free and when you do, the next episode is delivered automatically to you.

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Pro-democracy advocates in Hong Kong haven’t given up yet, while more Chinese officials slated for anti-graft probes opt for suicide rather than the death penalty. Plus today’s last day for entry into the AIIB’s ground floor.

China belittles Hong Kong’s Freedom, Suicide over death penalty, and last day for AIIB sign-up


Audio Version:

Tuesday | March 31, 2015

Pro-democracy advocates in Hong Kong haven’t given up yet, while more Chinese officials slated for anti-graft probes opt for suicide rather than the death penalty. Plus today’s last day for entry into the AIIB’s ground floor.

Hong Kongers continue to rally for freedom

For nearly two months, pro-democracy advocates took to the streets of Hong Kong, pursuing their dreams of universal suffrage. While that fight accomplished little in changing the course of the upcoming 2017 election, residents are now facing an assault on academic freedom.

Corrupt Chinese officials prefer suicide over death penalty

Chinese Present Xi Jinping has made it no secret he wanted to clean up the government and restore the people’s trust. A recent study showed that nearly a quarter of those placed under investigation kill themselves… and the public likes it.

Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank final sign-up day

Today’s the last day global leaders can sign their country up for the China’s Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB). So far over thirty nations have done so. Who will make it in under the wire to get that coveted Founding Member status? I share my pick to watch.

Pro-democracy advocates in Hong Kong haven’t given up yet, while more Chinese officials slated for anti-graft probes opt for suicide rather than the death penalty. Plus today’s last day for entry into the AIIB’s ground floor.

Keep up with news from the region by following Asia News Weekly on Facebook or Twitter. You can also send an email to the show with your comments, questions, and feedback. Just drop a line to podcast@asianewsweekly.net.

Subscribe to this and other podcasts at AsiaNewsWeekly.net. Subscribing is free and when you do, the next episode is delivered automatically to you.

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Eroding personal freedoms, political oppression, and what some say is an overall decline in democracy. These are all currently taking place in the region, but what is the state of human rights in Asia? That conversation is taking place in Asia… now.

What is the State of Asian Human Rights

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Eroding personal freedoms, political oppression, and what some say is an overall decline in democracy. These are all currently taking place in the region, but what is the state of human rights in Asia? That conversation is taking place in Asia… now.

March 25, 2015

Asia is home to 4.3 billion people or roughly 60% of the world’s population. It’s also home to cruel dictatorships like North Korea; China, who performs more executions than the world combined, and other nations that seem to have a revolving door on leaders, but what is the state of human rights in the region?

Phil Robertson, deputy director of Human Rights Watch’s Asia division joins the podcast to tackle that issue.

Do you live, work, or travel in Asia? Please weigh in on the topic by leaving a comment or replying through Facebook, or Twitter.

Eroding personal freedoms, political oppression, and what some say is an overall decline in democracy. These are all currently taking place in the region, but what is the state of human rights in Asia? That conversation is taking place in Asia… now.

Keep up with news from the region by following Asia News Weekly on Facebook or Twitter. You can also send an email to the show with your comments, questions, and feedback. Just drop a line to podcast@asianewsweekly.net.

Subscribe to this and other podcasts at AsiaNewsWeekly.net. Subscribing is free and when you do, the next episode is delivered automatically to you.

Three executed in China for mass killing, Russia urges US not to deploy THAAD, and Indonesia continues to struggle with ISIS recruitment.

China executes terrorists, Russia says no THAAD, and Indonesian ISIS arrests


Audio version:

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Three executed in China for mass killing, Russia urges US not to deploy THAAD, and Indonesia continues to struggle with ISIS recruitment

China executes three connected to Kunming killings

Three men were executed in China on Tuesday for their roles in a deadly rampage in Kunming last year that left 31 dead.

Russia to US: No on THAAD

Saying it would threaten regional security, Russia urged the US not to deploy THAAD to South Korea. In a way they could be right.

Indonesia arrests ISIS suspects

On the heels of an Indonesian police officer who appears to have skipped out to join ISIS, Jakatra announces it arrested five more suspected of raising funds and recruiting for the terrorist organization.

Three executed in China for mass killing, Russia urges US not to deploy THAAD, and Indonesia continues to struggle with ISIS recruitment.

Keep up with news from the region by following Asia News Weekly on Facebook or Twitter. You can also send an email to the show with your comments, questions, and feedback. Just drop a line to podcast@asianewsweekly.net.

Subscribe to this and other podcasts at AsiaNewsWeekly.net. Subscribing is free and when you do, the next episode is delivered automatically to you.

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