EDUCATION – 6

Oct 26
The government will write family names first when using the Roman alphabet for Japanese names on official documents from Jan. 1, the education minister said Friday. (Japan Times)

Oct 26
A record 2,829,416 foreign people were registered as residents at the end of June as more and more technical interns and workers enter Japan amid a severe labor shortage, government data showed Friday. (Japan Times)

Oct 26
Japanese Bonsai Trees have been a part of Japanese culture for over 1000 years going back to the Heian Era. Today, we’ll visit the Omiya Bonsai Art Museum 大宮盆栽美術館 in Saitama to see some amazing tree! One in particular is a 1000 year old Ezo Spruce that has a lot of personality. (ONLY in JAPAN)

Oct 24
Fukuoka Prefectural Police have arrested a staff member at a kindergarten in Munakata City over the alleged abuse of a male pupil earlier this year, reports Kyodo News (Oct. 21). (tokyoreporter.com)

Oct 24
The number of foreign students who changed their visa status to work in Japan after graduating from universities or vocational schools hit a record high in 2018, immigration authorities said Wednesday, amid a chronic manpower shortage in the nation. (Japan Times)

Oct 20
Bullying cases reported at schools across Japan totaled 543,933 in fiscal 2018, up 31.3 percent from a year earlier and the highest level on record, according to an education ministry survey released Thursday. (Japan Times)

Oct 18
Japanese commercial banks have been snapping up zero-coupon debt issued by a state-backed scholarship body in the latest twist in the the Bank of Japan’s negative rate campaign where no-interest loans can be a good deal for lenders. (Nikkei)

Oct 18
Japan’s education ministry says 332 school children committed suicide in the year through March, the highest number since records began in 1988.
(NHK)

Oct 18
The U.S. Marine Corps on Thursday acknowledged an error in the identity of a second Marine pictured lifting the American flag over Iwo Jima in one of the most iconic photographs of World War II. (Japan Times)

Oct 17
With a rapidly aging and declining population, human capital is one of Japan’s most precious resources. Yet despite Japan’s need to draw on every individual in the workforce, there is a section of the population whose potential is being overlooked: children in poverty. (Nikkei)