EDUCATION – 6

Nov 26
Lawyers for parents separated from their children in Japan said on Monday they would appeal a court decision that the government was not responsible for enforcing visitation rights. (Japan Today)

Nov 22
A teacher at a prestigious Tokyo junior high school allegedly kicked a student as corporal punishment in mid-September and left him with a broken rib, investigative and other sources with the knowledge of the matter said Thursday. (Japan Times)

Nov 20
Police have questioned, on a voluntary basis, four teachers involved in the alleged bullying of a male colleague in Kobe, western Japan, according to sources close to the matter. (NHK)

Nov 16
Japan’s standardized university entrance exam will test only reading and listening skills for English in the 2020 academic year while placing more emphasis on listening than current exams, the government-backed exam setter said Friday. (Japan Today)

Nov 16
As this year marks the fifth anniversary of the education ministry designating Hiroshima University as a “Type A Super Global University,” the university has taken major steps to achieve globalization. (Japan Times)

Nov 14
Japanese immigration authorities say 219 foreigners were staying in Japan as of the end of September after acquiring a new type of work visa for people with vocational skills. (NHK)

Nov 09
The Japanese Prime Minister has apologized for the postponement of the planned introduction of private-sector English tests for university admission. (NHK)

Nov 04
An Ainu indigenous rights association in Hokkaido has filed a lawsuit against the University of Tokyo, seeking the return of remains of their ancestors stored at the university. (Japan Times)

Nov 02
The government decided Friday to put off the planned introduction of private-sector English proficiency tests as part of Japan’s standardized university entrance exams due to start next April, the education minister said, following his gaffe over the matter. (Japan Today)

Oct 26
The government will write family names first when using the Roman alphabet for Japanese names on official documents from Jan. 1, the education minister said Friday. (Japan Times)