Bullets on the bullet train as three men found carrying guns on Japan's Shinkansen
soranews24.com -- Oct 23
On Monday morning, the Nozomi 114 bullet train was making its regularly scheduled run from Hiroshima to Tokyo. Its route along the Sanyo/Tokkaido Shinkansen line provides views of some of Japan’s largest cities and, if the weather is clear, even Mt. Fuji, but one passenger spotted something much more startling.

Smoking isn’t allowed in the seating area on the Shinkansen, so smoking rooms are set up between certain cars. The passenger noticed three men in suits had congregated near one of the rooms, and that one of them had a handgun attached to his hip.

The passenger notified the train staff, who called in the report to Japan’s 110 police emergency line at roughly 9:20. When the train made its stop at Nagoya Station, officers from the Aichi Prefectural Police boarded the train and conducted a search, and sure enough, all three of the men were discovered to be carrying firearms.

Luckily, the three men had no ill intent, and even though gun ownership regulations in Japan are extremely strict, none of them are in trouble with the law, because it turns out that they are the law. The three men are members of the Osaka Prefectural Police’s escort and security division and were en route to a training exercise in Tokyo.

It’s extremely unusual to see or hear of not-in-uniform police officers carrying weapons in Japan, and the Aichi Prefectural Police says that this is the first case in record of plain clothes police officers being mistaken for criminals and reported for carrying guns. All three were found to be operating within the allowances of police regulations, however, and thus no disciplinary actions are pending.

22日午前9時20分ごろ、東海道新幹線の広島発東京行きのぞみ114号の乗務員から「拳銃のようなものを持った不審者がいる」と通報がありました。 列車は名古屋駅で一時運行を停止し、警察が調べたところ、拳銃を持っていたのは大阪府警の警察官だったことが分かりました。
News sources: soranews24.com, ANNnewsCH
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