In case you missed it: Trump's awkward response to a Japanese reporter
Japan Times -- Nov 09
U.S. President Donald Trump’s combative relationship with the media was on full display Wednesday as he shouted and ranted at reporters in a news conference that led to the suspension of a CNN reporter.

At the presser Trump’s exchanges with CNN’s Jim Acosta and NBC News’ Peter Alexander turned bitterly personal, and he ordered a reporter from the American Urban Radio Networks to sit down when she tried to ask him a question about voter suppression, claiming she had interrupted another reporter.

Trump made several references in his news conference to how he feels mistreated by the press. Overshadowed by that ruckus was his exchange with a Japanese reporter, whose question Trump brusquely dismissed as incomprehensible due to his accent — prompting both criticism and sympathy from those watching the scene unfold.

The reporter asked, “Mr. President, can you tell us how you focus on the economic …”

Interrupting him, Trump asked the reporter where he is from. He had not identified himself before speaking, but the Nippon News Network (NNN), owned by Nippon Television, confirmed to The Japan Times on Thursday that he was a producer based in its Washington bureau.

At the reporter’s mention of Japan, Trump responded curtly, “Say hello to Shinzo,” referring to Prime Minister Shinzo Abe — arguably his best friend among world leaders.

Trump went on to say he was sure Abe is “happy about tariffs on his cars.”

The reporter tried again, asking Trump: “How do you focus on the trade and economic issues with Japan? Will you ask Japan to do more?”

Trump, however, replied, “I really don’t understand you.”

When the reporter tried again, the president pounced on the only phrase he seemed to understand.

“Trade with Japan?” he said, going on to complain about how, despite Abe being a “very good friend” of his, Japan “does not treat the United States fairly on trade.”

News source: Japan Times
Jul 22
Japan's ruling coalition is set to maintain control of the Upper House following Sunday's election. But it fell short of maintaining a key threshold. The coalition and lawmakers in favor of amending the Constitution will not hold a two-thirds majority of the chamber. (NHK)
Jul 22
Two wheelchair-bound candidates won seats in Japan’s upper house vote on Sunday, media projections showed, a sign of changing attitudes towards disabled people in a country where they have long been encouraged to stay in the shadow. (Reuters)
Jul 22
After Sunday’s election, the ruling Liberal Democratic Party — along with its coalition partner Komeito — remains firmly in the saddle with a strong majority in both the Upper and Lower Houses of the Diet. (Japan Times)
Jul 21
Unstable atmospheric conditions caused by moist air flowing into a tropical storm are dumping heavy rain in some parts of western Japan, especially the northern Kyushu region. (NHK)
Jul 20
The tragedy that struck Kyoto Animation has sent shock waves across the world, as the Japanese studio's works are highly regarded both at home and abroad. (Nikkei)
Jul 20
Police say the man suspected of causing the fatal fire at an animation studio in Kyoto is Shinji Aoba, a 41-year-old resident of Saitama City, near Tokyo. (NHK)
Jul 20
A man who attempted to drive a car filled with flammable fuels into the Japanese Embassy here early Friday died in the hospital after suffering burns when the vehicle ignited. (Nikkei)
Jul 20
Asahi Group Holdings, Japan's biggest brewer, has struck a deal to acquire leading Australian player Carlton and United Breweries. (Nikkei)
Jul 20
Japan, China and six other economies of the North Pacific Fisheries Commission agreed for the first time Thursday to set annual catch quotas for saury, aimed at addressing fishery resource depletion. (Japan Times)
Jul 19
Police say 33 people were killed and 35 others were wounded by fire after a suspected arson attack at an animation studio in Japan's western city of Kyoto. (NHK)