Olympus whistleblower Michael Woodford wins pension suit brought by Japan firm's U.K. subsidiary
Japan Times -- Mar 13
The former CEO of Olympus, who blew the whistle in 2011 on a massive accounting scandal at the medical equipment maker, has won a London court battle over alleged wrongdoing linked to his £64 million (¥9.4 billion) pension.

The Olympus U.K. subsidiary KeyMed sued Michael Woodford and former company director Paul Hillman in 2016, alleging they had breached their duties as directors and trustees of a defined benefit pension plan and conspired to maximize their pension benefits by unlawful means.

London High Court Judge Marcus Smith said Monday he saw no evidence of dishonest or improper conduct by the company veterans, adding that any failings identified by KeyMed could be attributable to “an innocent failure of process” in a busy company.

“In these circumstances, I find that the defendants acted honestly and did not breach the duties … dishonestly or at all,” he said in a judgment.

Woodford, who joined KeyMed as a 20-year-old salesman in 1981 and rose through the ranks to become Olympus’ first foreign chief executive in 2011, was fired two weeks into the top job after persistently querying unexplained payments. He then alerted global authorities and the media.

Olympus initially said Woodford was fired for failing to understand its management style and Japanese culture. But the company later admitted it had used improper accounting to conceal investment losses, and restated years of financial results. In September 2012, the company and three former executives pleaded guilty in Japan to cover-up charges.

News source: Japan Times
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