Govt. raps university with missing intl. students
NHK -- Jun 12
The Japanese government is taking action against a university for losing track of more than a thousand foreign students.

The government launched an inquiry into Tokyo University of Social Welfare after it came to light that many foreign students, including Vietnamese and Nepalese, were unaccounted for at a campus in Kita Ward, Tokyo. The school has four campuses across Japan.

A probe by the education and justice ministries found that the university lost track of the whereabouts of 1,610 foreign students during a three-year period ending March 2019.

Among them, 1,113 belonged to the university's "international research students program," a preliminary course for those aiming to become regular students.

The university is said to have accepted many students who lacked the required level of Japanese proficiency as "research students."

The government says the university's administrators need to take responsibility for accepting foreign students without being adequately prepared. It also criticized the university for losing contact with a large number of them.

Government officials have decided to halt the issuance of residency permits to new "research students" and will order the university to present a management improvement plan by the end of July.

Justice Minister Takashi Yamashita told reporters that visa issuance was being halted due to serious problems, including classes falling far below university education levels.

He said his ministry will work with the education ministry to implement counter-measures and improve trust in the country's system for accepting foreign personnel.

東京福祉大学で過去3年間に所在不明になっている留学生が1600人以上に上っていることが分かり、国は状況が改善されるまで大半の留学生の受け入れを認めないことを決めました。 文部科学省などが立ち入り調査を行った結果、東京福祉大学では過去3年間で留学生約1600人が所在不明になっていたことが分かりました。国は留学生の受け入れ体制が不十分だったと認定し、状況が改善されるまでは所在不明の大半を占める「学部研究生」と呼ばれる非正規の留学生の受け入れを認めないことを決めました。また、留学生の在籍管理などが著しく不適切な大学は「在籍管理非適正大学」として留学生の受け入れを認めないなどの新たな制度を設けることを明らかにしました。
News sources: NHK, ANNnewsCH
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