South Korea detains 6 for illegally entering Japan consulate
Japan Today -- Jul 23
Police on Monday detained six South Koreans for allegedly illegally entering a Japanese diplomatic facility in South Korea and staging an anti-Tokyo demonstration there.

The incident came amid growing anti-Japanese sentiments in South Korea as the two countries are locked in trade and political disputes. On Friday, a 78-year-old South Korean man died after setting himself on fire near the Japanese Embassy in Seoul.

The six men and women were given temporary passes to enter the Japanese Consulate in the southeastern city of Busan earlier Monday after they told staff there they would visit a library inside the building, according to Busan police officers.

They initially stayed at the library. But they later abruptly dashed out to a consulate yard, holding a placard that read "Abe must apologize," referring to Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. They also shouted slogans criticizing Japan's recent decision to tighten its export controls of some high-tech materials, the police officers said.

No major violence or clashes were reported. But police detained the six people for trespassing because they were admitted to the building to visit the library, not stage a rally, the officers said, requesting anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media on the matter.

While the six were being detained, activists were holding anti-Japanese rallies outside the consulate. Later Monday, about 30 people rallied in front of a Busan police station, calling for the release of the six people, according to police.

韓国南部の釜山にある日本総領事館に侵入し、日本の輸出規制に対する抗議活動をした韓国人の男女6人が身柄を拘束されました。 韓国・釜山の警察によりますと、韓国人の男2人と女4人は22日午後2時半ごろ、日本総領事館内で「主権侵奪安倍糾弾」と書かれたプラカードを敷地の外に向かって投げました。韓国メディアによりますと、男女6人は「日本は謝罪せよ」などと叫んでいたということで、建造物侵入の疑いで直ちに身柄を拘束されました。この際、日本総領事館の前では釜山の市民団体が輸出規制に反発し、日本製品不買を訴える記者会見を開いていて、警察が関連を調べています。
News sources: Japan Today, ANNnewsCH
Jan 20
Japan will start issuing passports featuring art by ukiyoe master Katsushika Hokusai for people applying as early as February. (NHK)
Jan 20
The agriculture ministry will propose a new law aimed at preventing the smuggling of genetic materials, such as fertilized eggs and semen, related to wagyu cattle to other countries. (Japan Times)
Jan 19
Fears are mounting that a new coronavirus identified in China may spread, not only infecting humans but also hurting the world’s second-biggest economy, which already is beset by a trade war with the United States. (Japan Times)
Jan 19
Five major Tokyo-based private television networks will take turns airing daily coverage of the Tokyo Olympic Games this summer, sources close to the matter said Saturday. (Kyodo)
Jan 19
Three employees were slashed by four men in a bar in Shinjuku, Tokyo, early Saturday morning. (Japan Today)
Jan 18
An international group of geologists on Friday formally adopted “Chibanian” as the name of a geologic age spanning 770,000 to 126,000 years ago, researchers said, marking the first time a Japanese name has been chosen. (Japan Times)
Jan 18
With Japanese society often placing intense pressure on teens and adults alike, as well as traditional values that can frame self-sacrifice as an admirable way of taking responsibility, a high suicide rate has long been a dark mark on the nation’s culture. (soranews24.com)
Jan 18
The Hiroshima High Court on Friday revoked a lower court decision and ordered Shikoku Electric Power Co. to suspend a reactor in western Japan, dealing a blow to the government's bid to bring more reactors back online after the 2011 nuclear crisis. (Kyodo)
Jan 18
Japanese Environment Minister Shinjiro Koizumi, a potential future prime minister according to some opinion polls, said he became the father of a baby boy on Friday. (Kyodo)
Jan 17
The report Thursday of Japan's first case of the new coronavirus that emerged in China last month has underscored issues with Tokyo's defenses against cross-border outbreaks as the region's busiest travel season of the year begins. (Nikkei)