Japan looks to encourage paternity leave by raising subsidies
Kyodo -- Aug 23
To boost the number of male employees taking paternity leave and promote female participation in the workforce, Japan's labor ministry decided to increase government subsidies for companies whose employees do so, sources close to the matter said Thursday.

The rate of men who take leave for childcare is currently around 6 percent despite six consecutive years of increase, far from the government's goal of achieving 13 percent by 2020.

Under the current system, companies receive subsidies if they undertake steps to facilitate paternity leave such as holding management seminars or getting bosses to encourage their subordinates to take leave.

So far, small and medium-sized companies receive between 570,000 yen ($5,350) and 720,000 yen for the first paternity leave taken by an employee. The sum ranges from 285,000 to 360,000 yen in the case of large companies. Subsidies are additionally given if more take paternity leave, based on the number of days taken.

The labor ministry aims to add around 100,000 yen to those subsidies for every male employee at small and medium-sized companies taking leave if companies take more of an initiative, the sources said. Details are still being studied, but large companies will receive half of the sum to be given to small and middle-sized companies, they said.

Japan ranked first among 41 countries in a UNICEF report in June on the childcare system for men based on subsidies and the length of paternity and childcare leave in 2016.

The report also noted, however, that the number of men who took advantage of the system in Japan was very low, giving reasons that included businesses being short-handed and company culture that made it difficult for employees to request childcare leave.

News source: Kyodo
Jan 15
The communications ministry on Tuesday authorized Japanese public broadcaster NHK to start simultaneous online streaming of its television programs from April. (Japan Today)
Jan 14
Aichi Prefectural Police last week arrested a student at Meijo University in Nagoya over the alleged stabbing of a teacher, reports NHK (Jan. 10). (tokyoreporter.com)
Jan 13
Young men and women in northeastern Japan have talked about their hopes for rebuilding towns that were devastated by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami. (NHK)
Jan 13
At first glance, things seem to be getting better for Japanese women. (Japan Times)
Jan 10
A 62-year-old teacher and operator of a cram school in Nara City has been arrested for using dog collars to restrain one of his students, a young girl in her teens, last November. (Japan Today)
Jan 10
A Japan-run language school that saw its stock soar almost 12-fold last year is planning to expand into new business areas as its chief executive officer tries to keep the rally alive. (Japan Times)
Dec 27
An international meeting on people who have withdrawn from society has taken place in Japan. Its aim was to discuss how to support such people and their families. (NHK)
Dec 26
Japan's welfare ministry estimates that the number of births in the country for the whole of this year will fall below 900,000 for the first time. The decline would be faster than the government's earlier prediction. (NHK)
Dec 24
The government will increase its employment quota for teachers at public elementary and junior high schools by 1,726 in fiscal 2020. (Japan Times)
Dec 21
From elementary to high school, children in Japan are breaking records for bad eyesight, an education ministry health survey showed Friday. (Japan Times)