Kono protests S.Korea decision to exit intel pact
NHK -- Aug 23
Japan's Foreign Minister Taro Kono has summoned South Korea's ambassador and lodged a protest at Seoul's decision to end an intelligence-sharing agreement between the two countries.

Kono met South Korea's Ambassador Nam Gwan-pyo on Thursday after Seoul made the decision earlier in the day.

Speaking to reporters after the talks, Kono said South Korea's decision is a completely misguided response to the current regional security environment.

Seoul linked its decision to Japan's planned tightening of controls on exports to South Korea. But Kono said Seoul's claim is totally unacceptable as the two matters are completely separate.

He said relations between Japan and South Korea are now very strained following South Korea's extremely negative and unreasonable moves, including the latest decision.

Kono said the Japanese government will maintain its consistent stance on various issues and continue to strongly urge South Korea to respond wisely.

He added Seoul had not notified Tokyo of its decision by Thursday night.

The pact is called the General Security of Military Information Agreement, or GSOMIA. The deal has been automatically renewed every year since it was signed in 2016. Either nation can pull out after giving notice by Saturday.

韓国政府がGSOMIA(軍事情報包括保護協定)の破棄を決定したことについて河野外務大臣は談話を発表し、「完全に見誤った対応と言わざるを得ず、極めて遺憾」と批判しました。
News sources: NHK, ANNnewsCH
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