Category Archives: TRAVEL

Making Reservations in Japanese

Source: Gaijin Pot

Nothing beats getting out of the house and traveling somewhere new in Japan — even if it’s just a one-night expedition.

Yet, unless you plan on staying up all night like it’s your first night out in Shibuya, you’re going to have to make proper overnight reservations. If you’re like me, this can be a daunting task even if you’re speaking English. Why can’t everything be automated? Outside of the impersonal digital connections, let’s go over how to make some reservations in Japanese so you can get out of the house and explore Japan to your heart’s content.

In Japan, you will also find you have a third lodging option outside of a hotel or a hostel: a ryokan.

Most places here take credit cards and Visa (or JCB or MasterCard) debit cards. I would still advise to err on the side of caution and bring cash with you to your destination — just in case. Especially if you plan on booking in more remote locations. In Japan, you will also find you have a third lodging option outside of a hotel or a hostel: a ryokan. A ryokan is a traditional Japanese-style inn that has tatami rooms, typically an onsen (communal bath) and your own personal yukata to shuffle around in.

Luckily, you can book most hostels here in English and can conveniently do so from Hostel World. Additionally, JapanICan lets you book ryokan and hotels in English as well. Let’s not forget that Airbnb also allows bookings in English if you’re seeking a more personal and lived in experience. For the remaining establishments that don’t support this service let’s go over a typical interaction.

Reservation dialogue

Speaker

Japanese

Romaji

English

Hotel staff: もしもし東京ホテルでございます。 Moshimoshi, Tokyo hoteru de gozaimasu. Hello, it’s Hotel Tokyo.
You: 予約お願いします。 Yoyaku onegai-shimasu. I would like to make a reservation.
Hotel staff: いつからお泊りになりますか?

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Kyoto Accommodation Guide: Hotels, Hostels and Traditional Inns

Source: Japan Cheapo

Kyoto is the heart of traditional Japan, and when deciding on accommodation there, you’ll be torn between hostels, hotels and the tempting ryokan.
Kyoto deserves a few days of exploration and has very distinct areas to explore, each with their own unique feel and trend for accommodation. While Osaka might be the home of the capsule hotel, Kyoto is definitely the home of the ryokan, but they don’t come cheap. Depending on your budget though there are affordable options across the board, and hostels are always available for those don’t mind sharing a bathroom.
Note: Below we have used pp to indicate if a price of per person, and pr to indicate if it is per room.
Top tips when considering Kyoto accommodation options

A ryok

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11 Things to Do on a Rainy Day in Tokyo

Source: Tokyo Cheapo

You can do almost anything on a rainy day in Tokyo as long as you have an umbrella. Put away that teruterubouzu (a Japanese rain-repelling charm) and embrace the drizzle! Here are our recommendations for what to do and where to go when it’s wet outside in Tokyo.
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1. Explore the malls
There are plenty of malls that include the whole package—from shopping to food courts and entertainment areas. Here are a few popular picks.
LaLaport, Toyosu
Have kids that need to let off some wet-weather energy? LaLaport in Toyosu has many family-friendly activities, including Adventure Island, which is a play area for kids under 8, and Kidzania, where children can experience pretend-careers and even earn Kidzania money.
If you’re wond

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A Double Bill of Excitement: Universal Studios Japan and Harukas 300

Source: Japan Cheapo

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In a move presumably aimed at thrillseekers, Universal Studios Japan (USJ) and Harukas 300, Japan’s biggest skyscraper, are working together to make Osaka’s most breathtaking attractions more accessible to international tourists. A little online investigation reveals discounted tickets, or special tickets that aren’t available through the usual channels.
Universal Studios Japan
Universal Studios tickets: Decisions, decisions
You’ll want to buy different tickets depending on what you want to see. There are far too many variations to describe here, but basically there are two ticket types: Studio and Express passes. The basic Studio Pass allows entry to the park, and most of the attractions—but you’ll have to wait in line

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