More than 70,000 walk along Inui road at Imperial Palace
Japan Today -- Dec 01
More than 70,000 people on Saturday walked along the Imperial Palace's Inui-dori (road) to enjoy the late autumn foliage.

By 3 p.m., more than 71,500 people had walked along the 750-meter-long road, palace officials said. About 3,000 people were already lined up from early morning, so the gate was opened 15 minutes ahead of time, at 8:45 a.m.

Visitors can observe the exteriors of Daijokyu, a cluster of some 30 buildings built in the East Gardens for Emperor Naruhito's enthronement rite, known as the Daijosai.

Inui-dori will be open to the public from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. each day until Dec 8.

News source: Japan Today
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