Japan recovering from Jebi
NHK -- Sep 05
One day has passed since Typhon Jebi tore through western parts of Japan. Efforts are underway to grapple with the devastating aftermath. 11 people died, with hundreds more injured.

And a major operation to free thousands of stranded people from a hard-hit airport is still in full swing.

About 3,000 people were forced to spend the night at Kansai International Airport after it was flooded by a storm surge.

Busses are now shuttling them from the off-shore airport to the mainland by bus. People say it's been a long ordeal.

A man in his 50s says, "The long line for the bus makes me more tired."

A woman in her 30s says, "My flight was canceled at about 4 or 5 o'clock, so I had to stay at the airport. / But I'm glad to go home."

Ferries are also moving people to Kobe. A man in his 40s says "I'm exhausted, but I'm glad to come back safely."

A woman in her 30s says, "I had a hard time. I felt anxiety because there was no information, no power, and no food."

The airport is still closed with all flights cancelled. Officials say the power is still out in some parts of the main terminal and another facility is flooded. They add it's unclear when the airport will open again.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has ordered government officials to do all they can to get stranded people out of the airport and to help with efforts to re-open it.

Meanwhile, Coast Guard officials are investigating why a fuel tanker slammed into the airport's only link to the mainland.

One side of the bridge was completely cut off. The tanker's 11 crew members were rescued. Luckily, no one got hurt in the crash.

Typhoon Jebi was the strongest storm to hit Japan in a quarter of a century. It overturned cars, ripped roofs off houses and caused widespread damage.

It also ravaged a world heritage site in the ancient capital of Kyoto. The roof of a traditional theatre and another national treasure were badly damaged at Nishi-Honganji temple. Officials are still trying to reach people who got trapped by Jebi, including dozens of children who were stranded during a school trip. They were in a mountainous part of Kyoto when the storm downed trees, cutting off their path.

Jebi also caused record high tides with storm surges flooding wide areas.

In Hyogo prefecture, about 100 cars went up in flames. It's believed sea water reacted with their batteries.

Although Jebi caused major disruptions to transportation links, many shinkansen bullet train services are now back to their regular schedules.

Some local trains are still experiencing delays. About 2,000 traffic lights stopped working in Osaka.

News source: NHK
Jun 15
Tokyo Metropolitan Police have arrested a 48-year-old man over the alleged abduction of a high school he met online, a crime he committed in order for them both to commit suicide, reports TBS News (June 13). (tokyoreporter.com)
Jun 15
Iran's supreme leader told Japanese prime minister Shinzo Abe on Thursday that it was pointless to reply to a message he had brought to Tehran from U.S. President Donald Trump, as a peacemaking visit was overshadowed by attacks on tankers in the Gulf of Oman. (Japan Today)
Jun 14
A record 3,129 people were stranded on Japanese mountains last year amid a continued boom in activities such as climbing and walking, a police report revealed Thursday. (Japan Today)
Jun 14
Japan leads the world in paid leave set aside for fathers, but few take advantage of it, according to a new report by the U.N. Children's Fund based on legal entitlements from 2016. (Japan Today)
Jun 14
A 23-year-old male university student was arrested Wednesday on suspicion of killing a doctor at her apartment in Higashine, Yamagata Prefecture, last month, local police said. (Japan Times)
Jun 14
Toyama Prefectural Police have arrested a 52-year-old living in Toyama City who has confessed to killing up to 100 pet cats, reports the Sankei Shimbun (June 13). (tokyoreporter.com)
Jun 13
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe called on Iranian President Hassan Rouhani on Wednesday to avoid a further escalation of tensions and an unintended military conflict in the Middle East, as he sought to nudge Tehran toward dialogue as a mediator with the United States. (Kyodo)
Jun 13
The Diet on Wednesday passed a bill requiring dog and cat breeders to microchip animals, and owners to voluntarily do the same to their pets, in a bid to reduce the number of strays. (Japan Times)
Jun 13
A public uproar has forced the government to retract a controversial report claiming that retired couples reliant on public pensions also need sizable savings, but this backpedaling could further delay Japan's much needed reckoning with the overburdened program. (Nikkei)
Jun 12
Japan's westernmost point has moved further west by about 110 meters, after it was decided to include an ocean rock on official maps. (NHK)