Sumo attracts famous politicians seeking public affection, attention
Japan Times -- May 10
U.S. President Donald Trump is expected to attend the final day of the upcoming Summer Grand Sumo Tournament.

Often when visiting dignitaries watch sumo at Ryogoku Kokugikan they are seated in the Imperial Box, but on this occasion the White House has reportedly requested front-row seats.

One can only imagine the reaction of United States Secret Service officials when they heard the current incumbent wanted to sit among the general public in an arena that holds 11,000 people and has complete freedom of movement.

Even if the president has a four-person masu (box) to himself, he probably won’t want to sit cross-legged on the floor for any length of time.

With Trump slated to mount the dohyo with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, and present a trophy, the likelihood is that he will only be seated in his box for the last bout or two.

Abe himself is no stranger to the venue and has presented the Prime Minister’s Trophy in person several times.

The photo op is something that many of his predecessors also found hard to ignore.

In that respect sumo is no different than any other sport, as politicians worldwide are quick to jump on sporting success and grab a little reflected glory.

News source: Japan Times
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