Ancient Japanese tombs added to UNESCO World Heritage list
Japan Today -- Jul 07
UNESCO decided Saturday to add to the World Heritage list two tumulus clusters in western Japan, which represent an ancient burial system and the hierarchy of society at the time.

The sites, comprised of 49 tombs in Osaka Prefecture and collectively called Mozu-Furuichi tumulus clusters, include the country's largest keyhole-shaped mound named after Emperor Nintoku, who is said to have reigned in the fourth century.

The Emperor Nintoku mausoleum, officially called Daisen Kofun, is part of the Mozu cluster in Sakai and is 486 meters long. It is said to be one of the three largest mounded tombs in the world, along with the Mausoleum of the First Qin Emperor in China and the Great Pyramid of Giza in Egypt.

The 49 tombs, varying in size and shape, are supposed to have been built between the late fourth and the late fifth centuries. With the registration, the number of world heritage sites in Japan increased to 23 -- 19 cultural and four natural sites.

The listing followed a recommendation by a UNESCO advisory panel in May, which said the tumulus clusters demonstrate the ancient period's "socio-political structures, social class differences and highly sophisticated funerary system" and "an outstanding type of ancient East Asian burial mound construction."

Some academics have expressed doubt that the mausoleum is the actual gravesite of Emperor Nintoku, but the site continues to be managed by the Imperial Household Agency as one of the imperial mausoleums in the country, along with 28 other tombs in the two tumulus clusters.

ユネスコはまもなく日本最大の前方後円墳「仁徳陵古墳」を含む大阪府の「百舌鳥・古市古墳群」を世界遺産に登録することを決めます。地元では固唾をのんでその瞬間を待っています。
News sources: Japan Today, ANNnewsCH
Jun 04
Two Yomiuri Giants players have tested positive for the novel coronavirus, the Central League team announced Wednesday, casting a shadow over Nippon Professional Baseball's plan to start the 2020 season on June 19. (Japan Today)
Jun 04
Japan has reported 31 new confirmed COVID-19 cases with the total reaching 17,031, according to the latest figures from the health ministry and local authorities on Wednesday. (china.org.cn)
Jun 04
Japanese casual clothing chain Uniqlo will open a new outlet Friday in Tokyo's Harajuku neighborhood, marking a homecoming eight years in the making to the city's vibrant hub for youth fashion. (Nikkei)
Jun 03
Japan's Prime Minister Abe Shinzo has effectively given up on plans to change the start of the nation's school year from April to September. (NHK)
Jun 03
A hearing at a Tokyo court was suspended for hours on Tuesday after defense lawyers refused to wear face masks. (NHK)
Jun 03
Japan approved Tuesday a PCR coronavirus test using saliva, which is much safer and easier compared with the currently dominant method, which collects mucus from the back part of the nose. (Japan Times)
Jun 03
Experts in Japan are calling on people to use face masks cautiously in the summer when the risk of heatstroke increases. (NHK)
Jun 02
Japan is considering easing entry bans on people from four Asia-Pacific countries where coronavirus infections are now apparently under control. (NHK)
Jun 02
Regulations to protect workers in Japan from abusive bosses and colleagues took effect Monday to criticism that it only provides a road map to desk-bound bullies. (Nikkei)
Jun 02
Many tourist spots across Japan reopened Monday, a week after the full lifting of a state of emergency, with precautions in place against the novel coronavirus amid growing concern over a second wave of infections. (Kyodo)